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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

3 edition of The New-England diary, or Almanack for the year of our Lord 1725. ... found in the catalog.

The New-England diary, or Almanack for the year of our Lord 1725. ...

Nathan Bowen

The New-England diary, or Almanack for the year of our Lord 1725. ...

by Nathan Bowen

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  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Printed and sold by J. Franklin, at his shop in Union-Street, near the Green Dragon, where may be had the same almanack printed on a broad-side. in Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Whittemore, Nathaniel, -- 1673-1754.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBy a native of New England.
    SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 39821.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination[16] p.
    Number of Pages16
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16691933M

    Parker’s ephemeris for the year of our Lord Woodcut portrait on title. T (10 copies). The cœlestial diary: or, an ephemeris. For the year of our blessed Saviour’s incarnation. Hence this year of our Lord MDCCCXCIX has been the allotted day and hour for the writing of this book. There has been a trend of destiny which has brought not only a book on oldtime child life, and that book at this century end, but has included the fate that it should be written by Alice Morse Earle. Poor Robin's Almanack for the year

    made one Voyage to New England to visit my Grandfather Mr Henry. Sewall. And in the year he went thither again; his rents at New- bury coming to very little when remitted to England. In my father's. absence, Octo , my sister Jane Gerrish was born at Badesly. and was baptised by Mr Cox at Bishop Stoke in the house of Mr Boys. Nicholas Prestone, tailor, and John Outlawe, were attached to make answer to John atte Hille, and William, his brother, in a plea of deceit and falsehood; for that the same John Outlawe, at divers times between the Feast of Our Lord’s Nativity, in the 49th year, &c., and the First Sunday in Lent, then next ensuing, came to the said John atte.

    Early years. Born in Groton, Connecticut, Daboll was the son of Nathan Daboll (born c. in East Hampton, New York; died c. ) and Anna Lynn (born in Groton).He had two brothers, John (born ) and Benjamin (–), and two sisters Susannah (born ) and Amy (born ). Daboll's father was born with the surname Dibble, but changed it to Daboll. The literature section of Shmoop's video collection. Learn more about To Kill a Mockingbird, Huckleberry Finn, and Great Gatsby through ShmoopTube's Literature Video Section from the experts at Shmoop. Newcomers can take a tour of the site and its tools too.


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The New-England diary, or Almanack for the year of our Lord 1725. .. by Nathan Bowen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The New-England diary, or Almanack for the year of our Lord [Nathan Bowen]. Get this from a library. The New-England diary, or Almanack for the year of our Lord.

[Nathan Bowen]. AMES, Nathaniel. An Astronomical Diary: Or, Almanack for the Year of Our Lord Christ, [caption title]. Boston: Printed and Sold by R. and S. Draper., []. [22]pp. Self wrappers, stitched. Contemporary marginalia to few leaves, light toning and spotting. Fair, lacking final leaf.

The first almanac made following Dr. Nathaniel Ames' death. Nathan Daboll (May 5 [O.S. Ap ] – March 9, ) was an American teacher who wrote the mathematics textbook most commonly used in American schools in the first half of the 19th century.

During the course of his career, he also operated a popular navigation school for merchant mariners, and published a variety of almanacs during the American Revolution : May 5 [O.S. Ap ].

Which presidents were born in New England and ' 'The New-England diary, or, Almanack for the year of our Lord Christ, ' 'The New-England diary, or, Almanack for the year of our Lord. all his Book[s] (a Few only Excepted)."4 The Catalogus printed here probably dates from when Robert Treat Paine, then a fledgling merchant himself, sold a collection of books at a public sale through Jotham Maverick of Boston.

A memorandum of that account, including a list of titles retained by. Eben W. Judd has written: 'Kollock's New-York pocket almanack, for the year ' 'Judd's Connecticut almanack, for the year of our Lord ' 'An astronomical diary, or almanack, for the year of.

the new-england diary, or, al-manack for the year of our lord christ apply’d to the horizon of boston, n.

england, where the north daboll, nathan: daboll’s new-england almanack, for the year calculated for the meridian of new-london, in lat. 41 deg. 25 min. north, and 4 hours 45 min.

Poor Richard's Almanack (sometimes Almanac) was a yearly almanac published by Benjamin Franklin, who adopted the pseudonym of "Poor Richard" or "Richard Saunders" for this purpose. The publication appeared continually from to It sold exceptionally well for a pamphlet published in the Thirteen Colonies; print runs reac per year.

This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. AMES, Nathaniel. An Astronomical Diary: Or, Almanack for the Year of our Lord Christ, Boston: John Draper, []. 24pp. Small tear to upper corner of last two leaves with small loss of text on last leaf.

Sewn as issued. Very good. Drake Evans O'Neal Full text of "Catalogue of the valuable private library of the late M.A. Stickney, together with other small consignments, including town histories and genealogies, early American almanacs from to To be sold by auction Nov.C.F.

Libbie, auctioneers and appraisers" See other formats. An astronomical diary, or, An almanack for the year of our Lord Christ, Calculated for the meridian of Boston, in New-England, latitude 42 degrees 25 minutes north. / By Roger Sherman. The inaugural issue of carried the title of The New England Calendar: Or, Almanack for the Year of Our Lord On the cover was the disclaimer that the new publication was "Calculated for the Meridian of Concord, Latitude 43° 14' N.

Longitude 72° 45' W.: And with But Little Variation Will Answer for Any of the New England States.". The Online Books Page.

Online Books by. Cotton Mather (Mather, Cotton, ) Online books about this author are available, as is a Wikipedia article.

Mather, Cotton, Decennium Luctuosum: An History of Remarkable Occurrences, in the Long War, Which New-England Hath Had With the Indian Savages, From the Year to the Year (Boston: Printed by B. Green and J. New England Almanack, or Lady's and Gentleman's Diary: Providence, RI: William Goddard: Box New England Almanack, or, Lady's and Gentleman's Diary: Providence, RI: Sarah and William Goddard: Box New England Almanack, or, Lady's and Gentleman's Diary: Providence, RI: Sarah Goddard and Company: Box These two aberrant almanacs, like every book published in New England in the period, were printed on a press owned and controlled by Harvard College.

The Harvard authorities must have noticed—and let them go in. And the two almanacs—like al-most every New. “Christmas and New Year’s Presents,” in New England Galaxy and Masonic Magazine, Dec. 26, By the same periodical was able to claim that Christmas was a season “which custom from time immemorial has pointed out as a proper one for giving and receiving remembrances, and tokens of affection” (ibid., Dec.

23, ). The first almanac, An Almanac for the Year of Our Lordwas published in America by Harvard University. The most widely distributed almanac in the colonies was The Astronomical Diary and Almanack, published by Nathaniel Ames in Dedham, Massachusetts, between and Benjamin Franklin first published Poor Richard's Almanac in Comprising over early modern printed books bearing handwritten annotations, this collection offers rich evidence for studying the material history of reading.

The books collected here range in subject matter (from science and natural history to literature and philosophy), time period (–), and type of annotation (from scholarly commentary and cross-referencing to printers. Sir Ferdinando Gorges, A briefe Relation of the Discovery and Plantation of New England,reprinted in James Phinney Baxter, ed., Sir Ferdinando Gorges and His Province of Maine, 3 vols.(New York, [orig.

publ. ]), I, –; and A Briefe Narration of the Originall Undertakings of the Advancement of Plantations Into the Parts of America,ibid., II, 16–17; Raleigh.An Astronomical Diary: or, Almanack for the Year of our Lord Christ, By Nathaniel Ames.

Boston: John Draper, Richard Draper, Green & Russell, Edes & Gill, and Thomas & John Fleet, [].CHAPTER 1. New England’s War on Christmas. THE PURITAN WAR ON MISRULE. IN NEW ENGLAND, for the first two centuries of white settlement most people did not celebrate fact, the holiday was systematically suppressed by Puritans during the colonial period and largely ignored by their descendants.